Jason Brubaker

16 Bình luận

  1. I’ve just been posting on Instagram, Reddit and Twitter while I use webtoons as an archive.

  2. Thank you for posting this video Jason. The one webcomic that I have been impressed with lately has been SSSS which is carried by Hiveworks. They have a Kickstarter campaign for book 4 going on right now. I believe Comixology has gone through some significant changes with Amazon lately but I don't know what that ultimately means for new readers. I know the current generation likes the ease and wealth of options digital platforms offer. I still have that old school mindset and want to purchase physical copies of comics vice digital. I believe the larger issue is the current generation not enjoying the activity or hobby of reading from digital platforms or in physical form. TBH, I love to read but my children are not into reading books or classic novels for fun. New readers today should be attracted to the numerous indie comic publishers who are creating new content with quality stories and artwork. The question on the table is do they have the patience to look for or discover them. Yes, we live in a world of material item saturation and the 'silver shiny object' that screams (yells) the loudest usually gets your attention or resources.

  3. That was a great history lesson about the websites that influenced webcomic publishing.

    Thank you for this important lesson, Mr. Brubaker.
    🙂👍🏻

    At least, I have ZERO greedy intentions when it comes to sharing my contents – original and fan-made – to any websites, even if it's my own.

    What matters to me is my readers' enjoyment and entertainment.

    As long as they are happy about what I create and share, that's enough to make me happy, too.
    😊♥️👍🏻👍🏻

  4. AnD tHe SeAgUlL sAyS:
    mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine mine

  5. Great clip!

  6. Gesh this is deep…. Idk what the right answer is. I'm a little sad

  7. I started reading webcomics right around the shift to Webtoon and Tapas for English comics. Maybe 2013? I think what draws readers to large sites is that they are able to jump around and read tons of different comics while they wait for new chapters of their favorites to be released, as opposed to managing a giant bookmark folder of comics and checking for updates yourself.

    I think pay-to-read for these websites, though it brings in decent money, results in consumer disloyalty. I have noticed that independently published webcomics are way less likely to be reuploaded on pirating sites. I think readers feel more guilty pirating independent webcomics, whereas pirating a Webtoon comic feels like stealing from the company, rather than the artist. Also, paying for an independent webcomic feels to me like a bigger deal, getting a fancy pdf emailed to you, supporting the artist, etc. Paying for a Webtoon comic feels more like an in-app purchase on a cheap mobile game, imo. It almost makes me feel guilty?

    Forever grateful to Always Raining Here and Nimona for getting me into webcomics!!

  8. This is so hilariously accurate.
    So then what is the way? What does one do?

  9. It’s time for everyone to get back to their own sites and Link Sharing. Before crowdfunding there was the same thing on personal sites called “PRE-ORDERS!!”

  10. Got more vicious than I was expecting haha. Great video, dude!

  11. I'd be interested in hearing a conversation between you and the Comic Lab guys. Brad and Dave are still hosting their comic sites while using those other platforms ontop of Kickstarter. Three awesome minds in one podcast episode would be sweet.

  12. All things considered, I have my own webcomic website and what you say is true; I labor in relative obscurity. That said, I am planning my next project to be on one of the big host sites like Webtoon or Tapas, and that doesn't bother me. Whenever my sole-proprietor website has a hiccup or worse yet a full crash, then every penny I've scratched together to that point gets flushed down the toilet as I pay someone to bring me back up to functionality. Letting someone else deal with website stability & upgrade headaches is looking pretty good, really. I have neither the time, skills, nor patience to be a techie on top of everything else.

  13. Back when I started, it was on DrunkDuck. Then Platinum Studios bought it out, kept shoving Cowboys & Aliens down our throats, let the website bugs pile up, driving off creators like myself. It eventually shook Platinum off and sobered up to become just The Duck, but the damage was done.

    Project Wonderful was good. Made it to a hundred bucks before they shut down

  14. Oh man oh man, I’m asking myself this question. I wrote a thesis trying to sort out the shifting state of the comic industry in college, and man I wish I could’ve shown this video to my prof. What amusing yet accurate impressions of the various companies. XD At this rate, I’m not sure if the answer to where you should publish webcomics is clear yet, or if it ever will be. I think the “best” place may be a continually shifting target, as the big companies and smaller competitors continue to fight for the monopoly on users, content, and ultimately money. This is a very complex topic, and more factors seem to come into play as the internet rapidly continues to morph into this thing that has assimilated nearly every niche of society; at least as we know it in first world countries. At the end of the day, I think the most valuable thing is finding “an” audience and ensuring that you stay connected to them. Switching platforms throws a % of them off, and with so much data pushed at them every day, it can feel like a fight to not have your content forgotten on social media. I think there’re a lot of potential fans out there who’re interested in knowing the creator behind the content at least a bit. Humans are [generally] social creatures, so understanding the psychology behind why people use social media or seek stories in the first place (on a fundamental level) may hold a key to finding the answers here.

  15. I remember surfing the web, going from web comic to web comic through page links. I haven't gone web surfing from portfolio link to portfolio in decades.
    It does make sense to own your website, and traffic. It put the control in the artist hands.
    If artist were more tech-savvy and had subscriber sections on their websites, they wouldn't need Patreon.
    So they would'nt have to share their funds with Patreon or any other company. Just pay website fees.

  16. Nice preview 🙂 I was a kid when webcomics started online, and I read a lot of them. It's been interesting watching them evolve over time.

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai.